BCon Group Philosophy

The “BCon Group Philosophy” forms our corporate structure and underlying guiding principle.

The first iteration was issued in Sep. 1976 by Teruo Yoshida, the then President & CEO. It was later revised in 1979 and in 1993.

These core values, which have been well received by our clients, have guided our company throughout the years and are reflected in BCon Group employees' daily decision making and actions.


Central Values

Our organization is a sound organization. We take great importance in the sustainability, uniqueness, and reputation in all areas of our business. Our purpose is to legitimately raise profits and have longevity without doing evil. (and other 8 sections)


Communication・Organizational Culture

There are many different levels of communication such as the logical level, emotional level, and the behavioral level. When you think about every level the sender equals the receiver and the receiver equals the sender. Problems with communication can’t be blamed only on the sender or the receiver. (and other 9 sections)


Structure (System, Design)

Organizations are a means of doing work quickly and successfully (Form follows Function). Create an organizational structure that functions easily in an environment of constant change. If the current structure ceases to function well in the current environment and leads to inconsistency then find a clear solution and quickly change to a structure that functions well. In present times change is the norm. (and other 8 sections)

Human Resources

Employees of the BCon Group are capital, not a cost. They are members of an organization where employees should develop their knowledge, emotions, abilities, and economic power continuously. (and other 8 sections)


Problem Solving and Decision Making

What doesn’t change? What must not be changed? What must be changed? Keep these three things in mind when solving organization problems. That doesn’t mean that you should feel free to change everything. However, change needs are present in every organization. (and other 8 sections)


Management and Managers

In management excessive idealism and romanticism should be avoided. However, it’s important not to limit the ideals of workers. At the same time, it is an important responsibility of management to enlighten employees that even greater ideals exist. (and other 8 sections)